Doing

Achieving regional progress means working together to find creative solutions. 

The Pioneer Valley Planning Commission's professional staff of planners specializes in community development, economic development, environment and land use, regional information and policy, transportation and transit, historic preservation, municipal services, graphics and mapping, and Geographic Information System services. Under these broad areas, we provide an ever-expanding menu of services tailored to immediate local and regional needs with an eye toward the longer term and the larger context. Our approach is grounded in solid research and analysis applied in flexible and interdisciplinary fashion.  

Contact our staff and find out how PVPC can work with you.

Current Projects

A Complete Street is a street designed to accomodate all users in a safe, convenient, and comfortable manner. Complete Streets can include sidewalks, bicycle lanes or other bicyle infrastructure, dedicated bus lanes, pedestrian islands, transit stops, curb extensions, pedestrian signals, and other elements which add to comfort and ease of travel.

Click here to view/download plan.

Continuing, Comprehensive, and Cooperative Planning Process

Streets direct people; they movegoods; they accommodate cars,buses, and bicycles; they provide social connections, and ultimately they establish the
platform for the rest of the city to build upon.

An efficient street network that easily moves traffic is desirable, but it should not be prioritized to the exclusion of a street designed for the human scale—one that adds daily life to a city and accommodates all modes of transportation equally. This is the intent of the design recommendations for new streets and the reconfiguration of existing streets in Springfield.

 

The 2020 Decennial Census, a critically important attempt to count all residents of the United States, is quickly approaching.  Here in the Pioneer Valley, the results of the census will affect our political representation as well as our ability to qualify for a wide array funding opportunities from public, private, and non-profit sources that support development in our region.  In anticipation of the Decennial Census, the Pioneer Valley Planning Commission (PVPC) is organizing a Pioneer Valley region 2020 Census Complete Count Committee

“A staged, multiyear, intermodal program of transportation projects which is consistent with the metropolitan transportation plan.”

The Pioneer Valley Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) outlines  the direction of transportation planning and improvements for the Pioneer Valley through the year 2040.  It provides the basis for all state and federally funded Transportation improvement projects and planning studies.  This document is an update to the current RTP (last published in 2016) and is endorsed by the Pioneer Valley Metropolitan Planning Organization

The Connecticut River Clean-Up Committee (CRCC) was formed 25 years ago by the Hampden and Hampshire County communities of Agawam, Chicopee, Holyoke, Ludlow, Springfield, South Hadley, and West Springfield in partnership with the Pioneer Valley Planning Commission to address the hundreds of millions of gallons of untreated waste water flowing into the Connecticut River caused by our region’s legacy Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) infrastructure.

he Pioneer Valley Planning Commission (PVPC) collects daily traffic count information at sample locations across the 43 cities and towns in Hampden and Hampshire Counties under contract with the Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT)MassDOT requests specific traffic count locations each year as part of PVPC’s3C contract.

The stretch of the Manhan River between the Tighe Carmody Reservoir and the Connecticut River is listed in the 2014 Massachusetts Integrated List of Impaired Waters as a Category 5 waterway impaired for E. coli contamination. The Manhan River is also a Class B water, designated as habitat for fish, aquatic life, and wildlife as well as primary and secondary recreation. The lower 6.2 miles, which run through the City of Easthampton, are listed as not supporting primary recreational uses due to E. coli contamination.

Grant Funding to allow Green Design Inclusion into Planned Road Reconstruction Projects

One of PVPC’s major areas of work is reducing combined sewer overflow discharges into the Connecticut River, which is the region's most significant natural resource. Street trees planted in urban areas offer a low-cost way to address stormwater runoff into the Connecticut River, while at the same time providing more attractive neighborhood environments for walking and biking, and thus reducing car use and improving property values.

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